Total Eclipse

Game Development & Consulting

Production

Designing Points of View

Points of View is one of our favorite mini-games from A Clockwork Brain, here at Total Eclipse. It is very original, challenging and tons of fun! Just think that once developed, Yannis, who programmed this and most other mini-games, and Jonatan, who illustrated the game, were competing over 1st place on the leaderboards for quite some time, once the game launched.

This mini-game is among the ones that other brain-training apps copied from us, which is, without any doubt, quite flattering.

Points of View mini-game from Prototype to Final version
Points of View mini-game from Prototype to Final version

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Unity Port for A Clockwork Brain – DevLog #6

A Clockwork Brain DevLog 6

Week 27/10-2/11

Last Thursday, A Clockwork Brain got featured by Apple in the Number Puzzlers collection. This did give us a huge boost, both in downloads, and morale! We’re really looking forward to those features on Android. 🙂

As the weeks go by, we work less on visible changes and more on what goes on behind the scenes. In other words, nο fancy art for you today!

Since all games have been completed, last week, we finished the Options and Settings screens. We then we devoted our time on the integration of the offline server component in the actual game. That is almost complete now and both business rules and transactions can be run in the game. We also worked on the online version of the component, which connects to our backend and handles the online operation of said rules and transactions.

Continuing our work on game peripherals, we have been debugging and merging some platform-related components that will allow us to store information persistently on the device in order to create and use multi-platform leaderboards and achievements.We also purchased the Unibill plugin that we will use as our unified plugin of choice for in-app purchase handling across all platforms. Because we do not want to be dependent on any plugins, we are also implementing our own, plugin-agnostic, IAP interface on top.

Another area that sees lots of activity recently is QA on devices. Since Android has about 5235 devices, according to the latest number I found on the Google Play Store, it would be prudent to try and test our game with as many of the major devices as possible. I have been giving AppThwack‘s service a test, but unfortunately, since our game runs on Unity, it cannot run the automated tests. For this reason, we have created a small script that will automatically launch and play mini-games, in order to stress-test the app. We expect to have the first automated version on Appthwack soon!

Finally, on the marketing side, we have been really busy gathering and curating our media contacts’ information. By the way, this devlog – like most of of our other blog posts – will be uploaded on Reddit; if you’re a Redditor, go and upvote us!

That’s all for this week, thanks for reading!
Maria

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Designing Anagrams

There are a lot of games using anagrams as their core mechanic and they are essentially all the same. You get several letters and you either have to a) use all of them to form one word or b) use any of them in different combinations to create as many valid words as you can. It’s an interesting mechanic, no doubt, but it’s the same everywhere.

We wanted to create something new, something that takes advantage of how cool anagrams are, but with a whole different perspective. This is how Anagrams was born.

Anagrams mini-game from Prototype to Final version
Anagrams mini-game from Prototype to Final version

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Unity Port for A Clockwork Brain – Devlog #5

A Clockwork Brain DevLog 5Week 20/10-26/10

Last week we began by integrating the OBB downloader plugin for Android into our build. As this feature is only usable for Google Play distribution, we further extended it so that it is not included by mistake in i.e. Amazon builds. To do this we used Unity’s Platform Dependent Compilation capabilities, and specifically custom platform defines. So each time we choose to use split binary, we will also include a custom platform define to enable the OBB check inside the particular build. Uploading to Alpha was a bit messy, what with key signing and all that kerfuffle, this post helped a lot.

Quite some time was also spent in fixing a nasty shader bug that plagued the developers as well as our eyes: all the scenes that used a rolling texture, suddenly showed these textures as solid black.  This bug to the clipping multiply shader only appeared on the device, but never in the Editor. It turned out that NGUI required the shader assets to be inside the Resources/ rather than just the Assets/ folder.

On the peripheral side we completed some of the offline specific components that had been started the previous week and started to work on the online component that will be talking to the server. In parallel, we created the infrastructure for storing player metrics. We also continued our cross-platform abstraction efforts by working on a way to store data persistently on the device through a unified interface. And a last, but difficult task, was to polish and standardise the procedure through which we merge our libraries and plugins into the Unity project.

That’s all for last week!
Maria

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Designing Speed Match

In the past years we have been traveling often; every one or two months, my brother Argiris and I, would go on a business trip to Athens or someplace abroad. In these trips, I always carry my bright orange notebook, as I’ve seen that time on a plane can be very productive. I guess it’s because there are very few distractions and you can focus more easily.

In one of those trips, I was trying to think of new ideas for mini-games, and I started looking around, in case I could get inspired by my surroundings. Then I saw the windows, and I thought “let’s make a game with airplane windows!” The idea was that the window shade would open, revealing an item, and the player would have limited time to tap on it before the shade would shut down again.

Speed Match mini-game from Prototype to Final version
Speed Match mini-game from Prototype to Final version

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Unity Port for A Clockwork Brain – DevLog #4

A Clockwork Brain DevLog 4Week 13/10 – 19/10

Hey all!

Another week gone, another mini-game complete!

During last week we finished Word Length, which also happens to be one of my favourite mini-games, although I can never seem to reach the Insane Round. Besides porting the game to Unity, we also made some usability improvements, compared to its current version on iOS, which should now make it a lot more intuitive for the players to understand which button they pressed.

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Designing Word Length

Word Length is a mini-game that was inspired by a story I watched on TV 10 years ago. It was about a teenager that was able to tell how many letters there are in a word really fast, just by hearing it. It was very impressive! He was extremely fast in his responses and he was always spot on! I guess I found that remarkable, because many years later I had the idea to turn this into a game.

Word Length mini-game from prototype to final version
Word Length mini-game from prototype to final version

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Designing Scrolling Silhouettes

One of the first mini-games games we designed for A Clockwork Brain was Scrolling Silhouettes. The idea came from the hundreds of items we had from The Clockwork Man. These 1,500 items provide a huge variety of shapes and forms. The concept was to take advantage of these, and create a game that uses item shapes and pattern matching as the core mechanic. This is how Scrolling Silhouettes came to life.

Scrolling Silhouettes from Concept to Final Design

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Unity Port for A Clockwork Brain – DevLog #2

A Clockwork Brain DevLog 2Week  29/9-3/10

Last week we almost completed the porting of three more mini-games. More specifically, we began tackling the tile-based games, Sculpt Away, Size Matters, and Logic Tiles. These three games have very different mechanics, but are all based on using and manipulating blocks of tiles. The first part of last week was spent building the tile engine that would be used in all three games. After that, Sculpt Away was the first game to be finished. Size Matters was done next, but it gave us a bit of a trouble as there were some performance issues when moving lots of tiles of different colours. We promptly fixed that, and moved on to Logic Tiles which should be completed later this week.

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